BitTorrent launches its Entertainment Network

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Click here to read the full story >> Hollywood studios are going into business with one of their biggest tormentors: the peer-to-peer pioneer BitTorrent.The 45-employee company that calls itself BitTorrent is planning to use its software to launch a download site, called the BitTorrent Entertainment Network, that will distribute more than 5,000 titles from digital movies, TV shows, games and other media.The programming comes from studios, including Twentieth Century Fox, Paramount and Warner Brothers, that previously announced their intention to work with BitTorrent. There is also a new partner: the 83-year-old Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, which will take part by making 100 films available on the site from its 4,000-movie library.BitTorrent and Joost rely on P2P technology to enhance the user experience. The more popular a file is on either network, the easier and faster it will be to download. Whereas the iTunes store shut down last Christmas because of overwhelming demand, services like BitTorrent and Joost are designed to improve as demand increases.

Despite their history with unauthorized digital content distribution, both services are setting themselves up to provide some of the better digital entertainment services available today. The question is: Will their technology credibility be sufficient to lure into a more legitimate environment the millions of downloaders who previously have used their technology to steal content?

About Bittorrent.com : More than 135 million people have downloaded the BitTorrent technology worldwide. It basically lets people publish content to the Internet in a way that enables multiple users to quickly download large files by sharing the distribution load. While it has several legitimate uses -- game publishers use it to distribute software updates -- it also is used by such sites as Pirate Bay to allow illegal downloads of Hollywood movies. The move makes BitTorrent a distributor -- connecting content owners to the technology's users in an attempt to monetize their interest in digital entertainment. Like any authorized digital music service, the challenge is to entice consumers away from a free, pirated environment into a paid, legal one. The strategy aims to offer a better experience than the chaotic pirate sites.

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1 comments:

reachnetster said...

"Will their technology credibility be sufficient to lure into a more legitimate environment the millions of downloaders who previously have used their technology to steal content?"

Hollywood were *EXTREMELY* slow to realise what BitTorrent was all about and to a certain extent they've paid the price. The day Bram released it was the day EVERYTHING changed.

I'd argue they don't actually have a choice anymore. BT is almost ubiqutous now - they either get behind it and *try* and legitimize its use or we'll see non-stop piracy for God knows how long.

That said, content will always be stolen. DRM - in its present form doesn't work and can be circumvented (and it sucks).

It's pretty simple - give people what they "think" they want and at least you have a chance of competing. Start laying down the law by the implementation of "control-mechanisnms" and you're just asking for trouble - particularly when the people you're laying the law down to are Tech "smart".

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